Migraines and Ocular Migraines

The classic migraine is a severe headache, which in some instances may be accompanied with nausea. Ocular migraines are visual disturbances in which visual images look gray or have a wavy appearance. They almost always occur in only one eye. Other common symptoms are loss of vision, particularly in one eye, and increased sensitivity to bright lights. The visual distortion, when it occurs, normally starts in central vision and then moves off to one side.

The ocular migraine can occur either in conjunction with the common migraine or without the corresponding headache. Generally, when it accompanies the common migraine, the visual disturbances happen before the onset of headache symptoms. In younger people with common migraine, it is typical for the ocular migraines to also occur. As people age, it becomes more common to experience ocular migraines without headache symptoms.

In general there is no serious complications caused by ocular migraine. Treatment, in most instances, is not necessary unless the ocular migraine is linked to the common migraine.

Migraine triggers can differ from person to person. Here is a list of common triggers:

Change in caffeine consumption
Dehydration
Change in sleep patterns
Irregular meal times
Stress
Changes in weather
Alcoholic beverages
Hormonal changes in women
Bright lights
Strong odors
Physical exertion
Certain medications